Collards are a Southern Specialty

DSC_1320The Fourth Annual Collard Cook off celebrated in Murrells Inlet February 21, 2016, named Wicked Tuna the winner; Bernie Ortiz-Robles and Ms. Rai Catering and Cheesecake won second; and Henry Ford of Seven Seas Seafood won third place. DSC_1305 Wicked Tuna won the competition last year also. DSC_1354 Yummy collard egg rolls won for the most creative use of the greens. DSC_1307 Rutabaga added the color and juicy flavor to Henry's tasty pot. Here's the official judging wrapping up with calculations of their individual scores which were via blind tastings off-site. Our colleague Andreann Geise (top right) judges this and dozens of other competitions annually including the World Food Championships 2015.DSC_1342 Two dozen vendors entered the competition, and hundreds of visitors sampled as much as they could eat during an afternoon in the parking lot of Uncle Tito's Bar and Grill.DSC_1299 DSC_1303 Some were seasoned with a little possum (probably not really), according to one of these chefs. DSC_1325 Some were accompanied by cornbread and/or fried fish or more. DSC_1311 These were seasoned with duck and country ham. Collard greens are loose leaf vegetables in the cabbage family (along with kale and broccoli), supposedly with cholesterol lowering ability and cancer-preventative qualities among many other health benefits. Long before healthy eating was a huge consideration, collards probably have been enjoyed in the South for hundreds of years for their ease of growing in a garden.

Want to comment?