Tag Archives: art

Art Museum Exhibit Offers Intimate Look at Local Art Collectors’ Passion

For the passionate collector, art is far more than something beautiful to put on the wall. Each piece comes with a story: where and when it was purchased, perhaps an event or occasion the item commemorates. Possibly there was the thrill of the hunt: to find a work by a particular artist or with a special subject.

Mark Catesby, A Great Beast – Bison Americanus, ca. 1731-1743, hand-colored engraving, 24″ x 21″, collection of David and Christy Holliday Douglas

In its new exhibition, Grand Strand Collects, the Franklin G. Burroughs-Simeon B. Chapin Art Museum presents more than 200 works of art varying from ancient Egyptian artifacts and historical prints to modern and contemporary sculpture and paintings, on loan from 49 private Grand Strand collections. The exhibit opens Thursday, September 28, and runs through December 14.  Gallery hours are from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 1 – 4 p.m. Sundays.  Docent tours will be offered during the run of the exhibition.  Please check the museum’s website for details.

Paula B. Holtzclaw, Mountain Apples, 2005, oil on board, 15.5″ x 19.5″, anonymous

A previous Collects-themed exhibition, Myrtle Beach Collects, was exhibited in early 2005, featuring 152 works. Many of the collectors who contributed pieces to the earlier show returned to participate in this current exhibition, which also includes both two- and three-dimensional works in a wide range of media.
In addition to seeing the art, visitors will enjoy reading the accompanying labels that tell the story of how the artworks were acquired as well as their personal significance to their owners. Art Museum Curator Liz Miller met personally with each of the collectors to carefully document the provenance and background of each piece.
“Artists’ livelihoods depend on the passion of their patrons and it is up to us to keep the arts alive,” said Museum Executive Director Patricia Goodwin. “Grand Strand Collects reminds us that art is for everyone.”
Appearing concurrently with this exhibit is Jocelyn Châteauvert: The South Carolina Arts Commission Turns 50.  Châteauvert, a fellow artist of the Arts Commission, will present one of her extraordinary site-specific installation projects; the exhibition commemorates the 50th anniversary of the Commission.
Admission to the Art Museum is free at all times but donations are welcome. For information, call 843-238-2510.

SC WaterMedia Exhibit Comes to Spartanburg SC

For the first time in more than 10 years, the South Carolina WaterMedia Society’s annual Traveling Exhibit will come to Spartanburg, SC, in September 2017 and will be on public display at West Main Artists Co-Op.

Between Concerts

“Actually, West Main Artists Co-Op is the only gallery in Upstate South Carolina where this most-noted statewide exhibit will be displayed,” Spartanburg watercolorist Dwight Rose said. Rose, a member of the Society, was instrumental in getting Spartanburg on the tour list. “The last time the exhibit came to Spartanburg was when the old Spartanburg Art Center was on Spring Street.”

Dark Beauty

This is the WaterMedia Society’s 39th year of sponsoring this annual exhibit that juries work from watercolor artists from throughout the state and beyond. This year there were 183 entries, from which 30 winners were selected by Canadian artist Marc Taro Holmes. Five of the winners are from the Upstate and Western North Carolina. They are Diana Carnes of Pendleton (Tsunami), Patricia Cole-Ferullo of Tryon (Dark Beauty), Monique Wolfe of Greenville (Between Concerts), Lori Solymosi of Pendleton (Looking Back), and Ann Heard of Anderson (Blue House). More than $8,000 in prize money was awarded in the 2016 competition. The Best of Show winner was titled The Hands of a Fisherman by Lynda English of Florence. This is the 2016 exhibit that tours the state from the fall of 2016 to the fall 2017.

Blue House

The exhibit will open on Sept. 6 and close on Sept. 30. A private pre-opening event for donors will be held Sept. 5, and the free public reception will be held Saturday, Sept. 9, 5-8 p.m. The exhibit can viewed Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; and Saturdays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. There is no charge to see the exhibit.

Looking Back

“We are so honored to host the WaterMedia Exhibit this year,” WMAC President Beth Regula said. “We are especially excited that this is an opportunity for people from outside of Spartanburg to visit our gallery and community. The work this year is absolutely wonderful in its diversity of styles and content. Just within the five Upstate winners, you have equestrian subject matter, a nude, an abstract, a nonrepresentational, and impressionism. Those are just the ones from this region: There are 25 more works of art to be seen in this collection. If you have any appreciation at all for art, you must see this exhibit while you can.”

Tsunami

The 2016 exhibit was juried by Holmes of Montreal. He is author of The Urban Sketcher: Techniques for Seeing and Drawing on Location (2014) and the instructor for two online classes in location sketching. Since 2009, he has been a correspondent with urbansketchers.org. Additionally, he served as a board member and volunteer editor. Holmes was elected to the Canadian Society of Painters in Watercolor in 2016, recently winning their Sloan Award (2016) and CSPWC Second Prize Award (2017). He graduated in 1995 with a bachelor’s in fine art from the Alberta College of Art and Design in Calgary, Alberta. During his 15-year career, he has been as an art director and concept artist for various studios, including Electronic Arts, Microsoft, and Disney. He has worked on games such as Dragon Age Inquisition, Neverwinter Nights, and Baldur’s Gate, specializing in characters/costumes and fantasy-historical environmental design. His second art book Designing Creatures and Characters: How to Build an Artist’s Portfolio for Video Games, Film, Animation and More was released in October of 2016.

“There is a tremendous amount of raw talent, invested effort, and earned experience laid out in front of me,” Holmes said about the South Carolina artists. “It’s inspiring to see the range of ideas on display. Every artist has their own media and techniques, and the subjects they find worthy of immortalizing. With each one I get a new jolt of excitement. Having to look seriously at all the work, to try and understand the artist’s intent, and to deduce the steps in the creation, it’s been like a visit to a world class museum.”

Since 1977, the South Carolina Watermedia Society has promoted the artistic and professional interests of its members as well as providing visual arts programs to the public. The Society works towards achieving its goals by making the accomplishments of its members available to a broad base of South Carolinians. SCWS, the largest statewide visual arts group, is an active presenting organization. It nurtures and promotes South Carolina artists by providing exhibition opportunities, special programs to market their original works, and educational programs.

WMAC is the only studio art co-op in Spartanburg County and art is produced and on display throughout the 20,000 square foot building, which is a former church. The exhibitions, workshops, performances, and educational opportunities, along with artists’ studios, subsist in the creation of a unique environment, a one-of-a-kind facility that houses like-minded individuals who share a common creative consciousness. The nonprofit organization has 32 studios and more than 50 member artists.

Other South Carolina cities and counties that are hosting this exhibit include Marion County, Sumter, Hartsville, North Charleston, Lancaster, and Aiken. The travel arrangements are being managed by the SC State Museum.

There is no cost to see this exhibit, and it is open Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Saturdays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. WMAC is located at 578 West Main Street, Spartanburg, SC. For more information, please call (864) 804-6501.

Calabash Gallery Presents Exhibition Especially for Area Visitors

Sunset River Marketplace art gallery in Calabash, NC will present Take a Little Coast Home With You, a collection of small coastal-themed paintings – all designed for easy transport home.  The exhibition, which runs from August 1 through Sept. 9, features original works by 24 artists who have been invited to participate in the special event.

There will be a reception to meet the artists on Thursday, August 3 from 5 to 7 p.m. The public is invited and there is no charge.

Artist Nancy Hughes Hiller, Morning Beach, oil, 10 x 10 inches

According to owner Ginny Lassiter, “Visitors to the area have always played a major role in our gallery, but we’ve never developed an exhibition quite like this for them. The artists in this show are specifically working on canvases small enough to pop in your suitcase and take home with you. The pieces are beautiful and will help create wonderful memories of a trip to the Carolina coast.”

EPSON MFP image

Art mediums for Take a Little Coast Home With You run the gamut from oil, pastel, acrylic and watercolor to metal and gyotaku (fish printing). Participating artists include Linda Young, Joseph Bardani, Celia Wester, Freeman Beard, Joyce Vollmer, Irene Beard, Ortrud Tyler, Roseann Bellinger, Nancy Hughes Miller, Roger Tatum, Elaine Bigelow, Mary Smith, Brenda Butka, Brooks Pearce, Sue Coley, Phil Meade, Ruth Cox, Ann Parks McCray, Nancy Guiry, Ann Lees, Rick Steingress & Cat Wondergem, Gary Halberstadt and Ginny Lassiter.

 

Sunset River Marketplace showcases work by approximately 150 North and South Carolina artists, and houses some 10,000 square feet of oils, acrylics, watercolors, pastels, mixed media, art glass, fabric art, pottery, sculpture, turned and carved wood and artisan-created jewelry. There are two onsite kilns and four wheels used by students in the ongoing pottery classes offered by the gallery. A custom framing department is available. There are realistic and abstract art classes as well as workshops by nationally and regionally known artists. The gallery’s Coffee With the Authors programs feature presentations by local and regional authors. A Paint & Party series provides a fun after-work experience for those with no previous art background. For more information, call 910.575.5999 or visit the website at www.sunsetrivermarketplace.com.

Sunset River Marketplace is located at 10283 Beach Drive SW (Hwy. 179), Calabash, N.C. Regular hours are Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For daily updates, “like” the gallery’s page on Facebook.

Sunset River Marketplace presents two new exhibitions opening June 7

Sunset River Marketplace art gallery in Calabash announces the opening of two art exhibitions in June.  Tarheel Wandering: a Journey in Black & White features the sgraffito pottery of Lincoln County artist Raine Middleton.  An opening reception for Tarheel Wandering is scheduled for June 7 from 5 to 7 p.m. The show runs through July 29. POV: Abstraction showcasing abstract acrylic paintings by gallery owner Ginny Lassiter also opens June 7. It runs through July 8.

Lincoln County , NC artist Raine Middleton follows a path of creativity originally taken by her ancestors. She refers to herself as a “master doodler.” She throws porcelain on the pottery wheel, painting the piece in black slip. She paints her designs freehand on each piece and then carves out the background.  The ancient pottery decorating technique is known as Sgraffito and Middleton is indeed a master.

According to the artist, “Tarheel Wandering refers to the physical wandering of a traveler as well as the more esoteric wandering of a native North Carolinian. As an artist, my pottery designs are inspired by the beauty of the state from mountains, piedmont, and coastal regions.”

Fresh from showing at the Arts Council in Wilson, NC, Ginny Lassiter brings her exhibition of abstract acrylics back to the beach in an exhibition titled POV: Abstraction. She has a keen eye and uses a limited palette adeptly, the result being a body of work with rich coloration and an architectural feel.

 

Although she graduated from East Carolina University with a major in art, Lassiter didn’t start painting seriously until 2013 when she sat in on a workshop with North Carolina artist Sterling Edwards. “He really pushed me to develop my own voice, my own art,” she says. She also credits her design instructor at East Carolina, the late Warren Chamberlain. “With his help, I learned the importance of spontaneity and the value in limiting my palette. It keeps the work from becoming too busy.”

 

Sunset River Marketplace showcases work by approximately 150 North and South Carolina artists, and houses some 10,000 square feet of oils, acrylics, watercolors, pastels, mixed media, art glass, fabric art, pottery, sculpture, turned and carved wood and artisan-created jewelry. There are two onsite kilns and four wheels used by students in the ongoing pottery classes offered by the gallery. A custom framing department is available. There are realistic and abstract art classes as well as workshops by nationally and regionally known artists. The gallery’s Coffee With the Authors programs feature presentations by local and regional authors. A Paint & Party series provides a fun after-work experience for those with no previous art background. For more information, call 910.575.5999 or visit the website at www.sunsetrivermarketplace.com.

Sunset River Marketplace is located at 10283 Beach Drive SW (Hwy. 179), Calabash, N.C. Regular hours are Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For daily updates, “like” the gallery’s page on Facebook.

Art and Food Blend at the Art Museum

This summer marks the 20th anniversary of the Franklin G. Burroughs-Simeon B. Chapin Art Museum in Myrtle Beach, SC.  Twenty years of living large in Myrtle Beach, SC, and the charming beachfront museum’s summer exhibitions and complementary programs promise to be a party your eyes and mouth won’t want to miss.
While the berries are bursting on vines and bushes, the peaches are bending orchard boughs, the corn is rising in fields and shrimpers are casting their nets, the Art Museum will look to outstanding artists to inform and remind museum visitors why the food of the South has risen from its humble roots to the pinnacle of today’s eating scene. The anniversary exhibition, with a companion photographic essay and lecture series, will provide a summer-long exaltation of the food of the South-now recognized as one of the country’s most beloved cuisines.
Feast Your Eyes: Celebrating the Food of the South, June 10 through September 17, will explore southern culinary heritage as nourishment and beyond: a form of cultural, political and artistic expression; an enduring source of comfort; sometimes an object of obsession; perhaps a symbol of class, race or gender…and always a cause for celebration.  Food and beverage icons, peculiar and particular to the South, will be examined with works in an expansive variety of two and three-dimensional media, including paintings in oil, acrylic and watercolor; works in pastel and pen; printmaking; photography; sculptures in ceramics, metal, wood and mixed media; fiber art, and functional works, such as handcrafted dining furniture, lighting, cutlery and serving ware.  These objects-over 100 works created by 58 artists, some historic and many contemporary-will invite viewers to explore the confluence of the three distinct foodways (Native American, African and European), which have converged over time and place to form the South’s unique cuisine, originally one of survival, now acclaimed for its honesty, comfort and generosity.

Brian Keuhn, Peach Harvest, 2016, soft pastel, 43″ x 29″, courtesy of the artist

Appropriately, the June 10 opening for Feast Your Eyes will be an afternoon anniversary celebration from 2 to 4 p.m., complete with classic southern cakes, bubbly, lemonade and sweet tea.  With party hats and cupcakes to decorate, museum goers can engage in hands-on fun as well as enjoy a docent tour of the mouth-watering artwork.

Ann Caudle, Boiled Peanuts, 2017, oil on canvas, 26″ x 38″, courtesy of the artist

A companion exhibition by local photographer Brant Barrett entitled Feast | Local will highlight the Grand Strand’s food scene.  With well over 1,800 restaurants (Huffington Post cited us as one of the U.S.’s top 15 “restaurant-crazy cities” a few years back), not to mention produce stands, farmers’ markets, country stores, bars and abundant food festivals, Barrett’s lens will discover definitive images that speak to our sense of taste as well as our sense of place.

Amy C. Evans, Things that Go with Oysters: Corn Meal, 2016, oil on wood panel, 12″ x 12″, courtesy of the artist

The third component to our summer programming, Food for Thought, is a series of eight Wednesday afternoon lectures, kicking off on June 21 (2 p.m.) with Nathalie Dupree, widely recognized as the reigning doyenne of southern cooking.  The author of 13 cookbooks, including three James Beard Award winners, with more than 300 television appearances and write-ups in major newspapers and magazines throughout the country, Dupree will reminisce on “place” as an important element in the cuisine of the South.
Seven other lectures will follow in the months of June through early September:
  • June 28, artist and storyteller Natalie Daise: “Collards-Why I Eat Them, Why I Paint Them”
  • July 12, Chief of the Cherokee Indian Tribe of South Carolina Dr. Will Goins: “Native Roots, Native Healing”
  • July 19, local food entrepreneurs and innkeepers Sassy and Brian Henry with Farella Smalls and Bessie Simmons: “Say Cheese!  From the Pawleys Island Sea View Inn to the Nation: Spreading the Love of Pimento Cheese and Other Southern Dishes”
  • July 26, Gullah Geechee Heritage Commissioner, cook book author and Coastal Carolina University Assistant Professor Veronica Gerald: “Nyamming: Eating Gullah Geechee Style”
  • August 9, Three local chefs/restaurateurs with three local farmers/purveyors: “The Chefs and Their Farmers”
  • August 16, Executive Director of the International Culinary Institute of Myrtle Beach Joseph Bonaparte, “So You Think You Want to Be a Chef”
  • August 23, Trappist monk, chief cook for Mepkin Abbey and cookbook author Father Joseph Tedesco: “Food for the Spirit”
  • September 6, Coastal Carolina University Associate Professor of American Literature Dr. Daniel Turner: “To Cook a Mockingbird: Symbolic Foodways in Harper Lee’s Classic Southern Novel”
For details on the Museum’s Feast Your Eyes-exhibition-related KidsArt summer programming, please refer to MyrtleBeachArtMuseum.org or call Arielle Fatuova and 843-238-2510.
Also on exhibit will be Douglas Balentine: Beyond the Horizon (May 30 – September 3, 2017).  Balentine is a Charleston, SC native, and Charleston and its environs offer the artist a seemingly eternal source of inspiration.
Gallery hours for the museum will be from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and 1-4 p.m.Sunday.  Admission to the museum is free at all times, but donations are appreciated.

Exhibit Beyond the Horizon Opens May 30 at Myrtle Beach Art Museum

After years of painting in classical style, Charleston-based artist Douglas Balentine felt the need to step away from the work he had been doing.

Douglas Balentine, Cargo, 2012, oil on panel, 19″ x 19″, courtesy of Roy Maybank

“So I went out to the beach [Sullivan’s Island, SC], somewhere I hadn’t painted before, except maybe when I was very young,” Balentine said in an interview with Charleston Art Mag.  “In classical art you have your verticals and horizontals, structure and geometry, but out there it’s just this big empty space, this expansiveness.”
Many of the works he created, while painting en plein air on Sullivan’s Island, contained images of cargo ships, which he observed “reference something that’s beyond our field of vision.  It’s as if to say the painting doesn’t end at the horizon, there’s more there.”
An exhibition of 43 works including studies, sketches, paintings in progress and finished paintings, titled Beyond the Horizon, opens May 30at the Franklin G. Burroughs-Simeon B. Chapin Art Museum and runs through September 10. Gallery hours for the exhibit are from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 1 – 4 p.m. Sunday.  Admission to the Museum is free but donations are welcome.
Beyond the Horizon is a retrospective exhibition of Balentine’s work as it pertains to the beach,” says Museum Curator Liz Miller.  “Visitors will get a well-rounded view of Balentine’s process, from his initial sketches and studies to finished paintings, one of which was a decade-long project and measures over nine feet long.”
Many of the included works are from distinguished private collections that have never been publicly displayed.
Although born in Charleston, at the age of nine Balentine moved with his family to Paris, France. During the family’s two years there, the young artist-to-be found innumerable stimuli in daily Parisian life – in particular, exposure to art in the world-famous Louvre Museum – which proved to be of lasting inspiration.  Balentine went on to study art at Parsons School of Design in New York and the Santa Reparata International School of Art in Florence, Italy.
In the mid-1990s Balentine returned to Charleston, where he found new inspiration in the natural and historic beauty of the area, which he interpreted through the classical principles of his formal studies.  This led him to create a more personal direction in his work which he describes as “coming full-circle back to my roots.”
“Through work,” says Balentine, “I came to understand that my interest was in the underlying elemental forces at play which are not just ‘out there,’ but also within.  Quiet observation deepens experience of the immense inner-connectedness of everything.  Perception is not simply about looking at but connecting with.”
His methodology consisted of placing his easel on the beach facing directly toward the ocean with his gaze directed at the horizon. “The challenge here is that one must confront empty space head on,” Balentine writes in his artist statement. “It is elemental. Earth/Sand. Water/Ocean. Air/Sky. It’s never the same twice. A continuous work in progress. The sand being sculpted by the wind and the tides, the ocean sometimes tranquil and rhythmically hypnotic, sometimes ominously vast and powerful.”
Museum director Patricia Goodwin and Curator Miller were attracted to Balentine’s work when they saw a piece on display at ArtFields, in Lake City, SC, in 2014, Miller recalls.  “We knew that we wanted to learn more and once we did, we knew we wanted an exhibition.”

Sunset River Marketplace features group show Blooms through June 3

Sunset River Marketplace art gallery in Calabash is featuring a group show titled Blooms from April 19 through June 3.

White Camelias by Ruth Cox. Oil on canvas, 18 x 24.

According to gallery owner Ginny Lassiter, the exhibition is celebrating Spring and rebirth with a colorful mix of works in a range of media.  Included in the show are works by Ruth Cox (oil), Ginny Lassiter (acrylic), Gene Horne (oil),  Karen Casciani (watercolor), Brenda Butka (oil), Beverly Offitt (pressed flowers), Louis Aliotta (photography), Roseann Bellinger (oil),  Joyce Volmer (oil),  Mark Hilliard (photography),  Sue Marion ( watercolor), Ardie Praetorius (clay), Kim Clayton (folk art), Pat Smelkoff (batik), Celia Wester (oil),  Micheline Sansregret (watercolor), and Karen Day-Vath. Sterling Edwards (acrylic), and the late Ramona Batsford Bendin (oil).

Hydrangeas by the late Ramona Batsford Bendin. Oil on linen, 24 x 30 inches.

“Spring is always an active time here at Sunset River Marketplace,” says Lassiter. “The changing season brings both new residents and visitors to the area, so we’re happy to offer an exhibition that presents a wide range of art and style. And we hope folks new to the area will stop by to enjoy the show and see what we have to offer.”

Brenda Butka’s evocative Blazing Coffee, oil on board, 16 x 20 inches.

Sunset River Marketplace showcases work by approximately 150 North and South Carolina artists, and houses some 10,000 square feet of oils, acrylics, watercolors, pastels, mixed media, art glass, fabric art, pottery, sculpture, turned and carved wood and artisan-created jewelry. There are two onsite kilns and four wheels used by students in the ongoing pottery classes offered by the gallery. A custom framing department is available. There are realistic and abstract art classes as well as workshops by nationally and regionally known artists. The gallery’s Coffee With the Authors programs feature presentations by local and regional authors. A Paint & Party series provides a fun after-work experience for those with no previous art background. For more information, call 910.575.5999 or visit the website at www.sunsetrivermarketplace.com.

Sunset River Marketplace is located at 10283 Beach Drive SW (Hwy. 179), Calabash, N.C. Regular hours are Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For daily updates, “like” the gallery’s page on Facebook.

 

Spartanburg SC West Main Artists Co-Op Opens Three New Exhibits in May

Spartanburg’s West Main Artists Co-Op (WMAC) will open three new exhibits in May: “Residuals” by founding member Addam Duncan, “Explorations In Wax” by Terry Jarrard-Dimond, and “Calming Rhythm: Washing the Soul Clean,” by Converse College students Christine Swetenburg and Nancy Vaughn. All of these exhibits will be open for free public viewing on Thursday, May 18, during ArtWalk, the city’s monthly self-perpetuating and self-guiding tour of local art galleries. The free opening reception will be 5-9 p.m.

WMAC, 578 West Main Street, is a converted 20,000-square-foot church now being used by more than 50 member artists to produce and showcase their work. The 32 studios accommodate various media, including printing, ceramics, pottery, textiles, jewelry making, quilting, sculpture, photography, and many others. In addition to the studio space, there are several art galleries and the opportunity to purchase locally made art.

Duncan, 36, is a native of Inman, SC. His artistic abilities travel many avenues, including painting, printmaking, sculpting, and writing both prose and music.  “Residuals” will be an exhibit of his use of leftover or discarded ink and paint to make abstract monotypes, printed directly from the pages of telephone books. “I’m using the ink and the paint that I would normally throw away to make abstract monotype prints on nice printmaking paper,” he said. “They are printed directly from telephone book pages, as the phone book is kind of an obsolete item in this day and age. The concept is ‘Why dispose of something that has the potential to be something beautiful?’” With no formal art training or education, Duncan has exhibited in New York, San Francisco, Portland, Seattle, Cleveland, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Charlotte, Asheville, Columbia, Pickens, Greenville, and Spartanburg. Since 2012, Duncan has owned Honor & Glory Tattoo in Inman. The unframed prints in this exhibit will be reasonably priced for sale. This exhibit will end June 10.

Jarrard-Dimond’s “Explorations In Wax” exhibit is a collection of nonrepresentational canvas images created with encaustic paint, which is a combination of beeswax, pigment, and tree sap. This is a rich medium that has been used for many centuries to create images known for their sense of depth. The works in this exhibit were created during the past three years and are noted for their striking colors and bold, organic, and contemporary images. In her artist’s statement, the Seneca artist said: “My work is the physical manifestation of my dreams, fantasies, and imagination. I experience the act of making as an altered state where I make unique visual relationships between marks, smudges, stains, and shapes. I look for moments of chance where these same elements unite to reveal figures, structures, landscapes, and mindscapes.”

Jarrard-Dimond earned a bachelor’s degree from Winthrop University and a master’s degree in fine art from Clemson University. She worked for more than 15 years as a sculptor and taught at several colleges and universities. Her work is represented in collections such as Coca-Cola International in Atlanta, The Federal Reserve Bank in Charlotte, and The State Museum of South Carolina, in Columbia. Her work has been featured in many solo shows, including Furman University, Columbia College, The Fine Arts Center in Greenville, and Upstairs Artspace in Tryon, NC. This exhibit will open Tuesday, May 16, and end Saturday, June 10. More info about Jarrard-Dimond is found online at TerryJarrardDimond.com.

“Calming Rhythm: Washing the Soul Clean” will be the joint graduate exhibition featuring the work of Swetenburg and Vaughn. This exhibition will showcase artwork created during their education at Converse College and will consist of acrylic paintings, handmade books, soapstone carvings, and clay work. The name, “Calming Rhythm: Washing the Soul Clean,” blends together the two artists’ themes for their creativity. Swetenburg works with a range of materials, including clay and handmade books. This body of work shows her exploration with water and its spiritual and cleansing effect that it has in her life. Much of her work is abstracted from the rain she saw hitting windows as an undergraduate student. Swetenburg is an art teacher in Greenville County, where she teaches 4K-5th grade students. She is also a candidate for a master’s degree in art education from Converse College.

Vaughn is a mixed media artist who incorporates dimensional aspects in her works, which include sculpture and the use of trapunto techniques in her paintings. She has always been influenced by words and music that often evoke vivid pictures in her mind, she said. Vaughn used these images as inspiration to create the work in this exhibit. She teaches art in Spartanburg County and is a candidate for a master’s degree in art education from Converse College.

For more information about these new exhibits at West Main Artists Co-Op in May, please call (864) 804-6501 or visit WMAC’s website at WestMainArtists.org or on Facebook.

Artists Vie for Honors in Arts and Crafts Guild Competition

More than 40 artists from around the Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, region will vie for top honors and more than $2000 in cash prizes in the 20th Annual Waccamaw Arts & Crafts Guild Juried Exhibition, opening Tuesday, May 2, at the Franklin G. Burroughs-Simeon B. Chapin Art Museum.

 

A reception (free and open to the public) will be held from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., with awards presentation beginning at 6:00. The exhibit continues through June 1, with gallery hours from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays. (Shortened hours may apply during some weekends in May. Call the Museum to verify open hours.)

 

Seventy-four two-dimensional and three-dimensional works were selected for jurying. Works selected for display include oil, watercolor, and mixed media paintings, photographs and fiber arts. With creations from artists throughout the Carolinas, the show is a perennially popular event with locals and visitors. A large percentage of the works on display will also be available for purchase.

 

Judge and juror for this year’s competition is Linda Daly Baker of Charleston, SC.  Her watercolors capture the transformative effects of light and its ability to abstract the subject matter upon which it is cast.  Baker teaches workshops internationally and is a signature member of a number of guilds, including the American Watercolor Society, the International Society of Experimental Artists, the National Watercolor Society and the Transparent Watercolor Society of America.

 

At the opening reception for this exhibition, Baker will provide insight on how the works were selected for inclusion in the exhibit and will participate in the awards ceremony.
Cash awards to be given include the $800 Rebecca R. Bryan Best in Show Award, as well as First, Second and Third Place awards of $500, $275 and $100 respectively. An additional 10 works will also be selected for Honorable Mentions.

 

Admission to the Museum is free but donations are welcome. For further information, call 843-238-2510 or visit www.myrtlebeachartmuseum.org

The Friends of Brookgreen Sponsor Fine Art Auction

The works of internationally recognized sculptor Glenna Goodacre will the centerpiece of a Fine Art Auction hosted by The Friends of Brookgreen Gardens May 5, 2017.

Brookgreen was selected to receive 15 of Goodacre’s works, including figures from her largest piece Irish Memorial, created in 2002 for Penn’s Landing in Philadelphia.  In October of 2016, Goodacre announced her complete retirement from sculpting and casting bronzes. She began destroying her foundry molds, so there will be no new castings of her work.

 

Three etchings and one lithograph by Alfred Hutty, considered one of the leading artists of the Charleston Renaissance, will also be part of this auction; as well as works from noted artists such as Linda St. Clair, Stephen Scott Young, Jonathan Green, Bobby Bagley, and many more.

 

Beginning April 28 and running through May 10, Brookgreen Gardens will have these works displayed in a Curator’s Auction Exhibit of Work in the Rainey Sculpture Pavilion.

 

Asked to describe her feelings about having her works as part of the Friends Fine Art Auction, Goodacre said “Brookgreen is very important to me. It is heaven for a sculptor, and there is much for an artist to learn there. I am proud to have had my work shown in exhibitions at Brookgreen, but I never dreamed one of my large works would be included in the permanent collection like Pledge Allegiance. Now, I am thrilled to participate along with collectors and Red Piano Gallery in The Friends of Brookgreen Gardens benefit auction to raise funds for my all-time favorite sculpture garden.”

 

Morris & Whiteside Auctions will provide several options for bidding, including live in-auction bids; telephone bids; absentee bids and bids via a live streaming webcam.  An online catalogue is available at their website https://morriswhitesideauctions.com/

 

Brookgreen Gardens, a National Historic Landmark and non-profit organization, is located on U.S. 17 between Murrells Inlet and Pawleys Island, South Carolina, and is open to the public daily. For more information, visit www.brookgreen.org or call 843-235-6000.