Tag Archives: historic

History Lecture Revisits The Battle of Port Royal Sound

Key Civil War Event Marks 156th Anniversary

Beaufort History Museum, in partnership with the Beaufort County Library, announces this season’s second program in its local history lecture series, The Battle of Port Royal Sound.  The event is planned for Tuesday, November 7, at 2:00 pm at the Beaufort Branch Library, 211 Scott Street, Beaufort, SC.

The Battle of Port Royal Sound was one of the earliest naval operations of the Civil War.  On November 7, 1861, a massive U. S. Naval fleet and U. S. Army expeditionary force sailed into Port Royal Sound and captured Fort Walker on Hilton Head and Fort Beauregard on St. Helena Island.  At the time, it was the largest armada ever launched by the United States.

Beaufort was among the first southern towns to fall into Union hands. The Federal occupation changed the course of Beaufort District history and led to the most misunderstood period of American history, the Reconstruction Era.

Berkeley County Museum and Heritage Center Executive Director and historian Michael D. Coker will bring this important battle, and the events surrounding it, to life.  He will share stories from his book,The Battle of Port Royal Sound, about this pivotal  point of the Civil War.

Admission is   free. A donation of $5 is suggested and reservations are required. To sign up visit the BHM website: www.beauforthistorymuseum.com Please print out the ticket and bring to the event. Registration opens October 25. (Lectures sell out. Those with tickets admitted first.) Funds collected will be used to support ongoing Museum programs, which are open to all.

Beaufort History Museum, located in the historic Arsenal on Craven Street, has   evolved to focus specifically on the history of the Beaufort District. It strives to manage and display artifacts and documents held by the City of Beaufort, telling the compelling stories of this area from the early 16th Century until modern times.  The Museum’s hours of operation are 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM Monday – Saturday.

Beaufort History Museum Panel Tells the History of Chambers Park

Reservations for October 17 Lecture Now Available

Beaufort area residents and visitors enjoy the beautiful setting and myriad recreational opportunities at Henry C. Chambers Riverfront Park, but it was not always so.  What is now a 7-acre waterfront promenade with a playground, pavilion, marina, paths for strolling and plenty of benches for simply relaxing and taking in the stunning views, was at one time a decaying and shabby wharf that mirrored a failed mid-20th Century economy.

 

At a lecture, presented by Beaufort History Museum in partnership with the Beaufort Public Library, there will be the chance to learn the fascinating history of the waterfront’s revival.   Spearheading the project was one of Beaufort’s most effective and beloved mayors, Henry C. Chambers, who envisioned the renovation and led it to completion after his election in 1969.

 

Titled Politics, Pilings and Playgrounds–Henry C Chambers Riverfront Park”, the lecture will feature a panel discussion moderated by Edie Rodgers:

 

  • Panelists: Henry C. Chambers, Ed Duryea, Harry Chakides, and Duncan Fordham discuss the trials and tribulations of creating Beaufort’s signature waterfront community space.

 

  • Date:  Tuesday, October 17

 

  • Time: 2 – 3:30 pm

 

  • Location:   First Presbyterian Church Fellowship Hall, Corner of North and Church Streets, Beaufort, SC 29902

 

  • Admission:    Free  (A donation of $5 is suggested. Funds collected will be used to support ongoing programs which are open to all.)

Reservations are required. To sign up visit the BHM website: www.beauforthistorymuseum.com Please print out the ticket and bring to the event.  (Lectures sell out. Those with tickets admitted first.)

  • Next Lecture in History Series – Tuesday, November 7

“The Battle of Port Royal Sound”  (Check website for more information)

Beaufort History Museum, located in the historic Arsenal on Craven Street, has evolved to focus specifically on the history of the Beaufort District. It strives to manage and display artifacts and documents held by the City of Beaufort, telling the compelling stories of this area from the early 16th Century until modern times.  The Museum’s hours of operation are 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM Monday – Saturday.

 

Spanish Artifact Revealed

The Marine Corps Recruit Depot – Parris Island,  South Carolina, near Beaufort, released a conservation report describing a ceramic Spanish artifact believed to be hundreds of years old. A local commercial fisherman, operating under a state permit, made the discovery in the shallow waters off Parris Island. At the direction of Parris Island, and with the assistance of the fisherman and the Santa Elena History Center, the artifact was delivered to the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology (SCIAA) for assessment and conservation.

The earthen vessel is believed to be an olive jar left behind from the Colonial settlement of the Port Royal region. The storage container is a Middle Style olive jar that would hold 15 liters and were produced in large quantity by Spain from 1580 to 1780. The Spanish olive jar was the primary container used for shipping commodities from Spain to the colonies across the Atlantic during the 16th through 18th-centuries. As large containers, olive jars transported a variety of contents, including bullets, capers, beans, chick peas, lard, tar, honey, wine, olives in brine and olive oil. Such vessels were commonly used by settlers at Santa Elena, the 16th Century Spanish town established in 1566 on present-day Parris Island.

The processed artifact is now stabilized, preserved and available for study.

“The discovery is now part of the Parris Island archaeological collection. The Parris Island Museum hopes to place the olive jar on public display,” said Kim Zawacki, archaeologist for the Parris Island Recruit Depot.

Dr. Andy Beall, chairman of the Santa Elena Foundation commented, “How wonderful that the largely untold story of early European exploration and settlements in our community continues to emerge. This exciting discovery adds to what is known about our local history. Everyone is very grateful to the Marine Corps for caring for this significant artifact.”

With regard to jurisdiction and ownership, the waters surrounding Parris Island are unusual. By virtue of a Presidential roclamation in 1918, the river bottom belongs to the federal government out to the channel, in both the Beaufort and Broad Rivers. Consequently, the commanding general is responsible for ensuring cultural resources on and around Parris Island are appropriately protected, preserved, and shared with the public. Parris Island works cooperatively with state agencies to manage the natural and cultural resources within those boundaries.

To learn more about the Parris Island Museum, visit www.parrisislandmuseum.com and for more about the Santa Elena History Center, please visit http://santa-elena.org.

Bluffton Lecture Series Underway

The Bluffton Historical Preservation Society presents Dr. Larry Roland.

The second lecture in a year-long series features Dr. Larry Rowland, local historian and USCB professor emeritus, who will discuss “The Early Explorers of the Lowcountry.” 

The lecture will be at Bluffton, SC, Town Hall on Monday, August 7 from 6:00-7:00 p.m.

Admission is $5 and will be used to fund the preservation and digitization of Bluffton’s history (documents, maps, etc.).

Upcoming Lectures:

October 9-Rotary Community Center 
Speakers: Emmett McCracken & Jacob Martin
Topic: What it was like to be a Kid in the Late Fifties and Early Sixties in Bluffton

December 11-Rotary Community Center 
Speaker: David Lauderdale, Local Opinion Column Contributor, Island Packet
Topic: Lowcountry Life & Times in Beaufort County

February 19-Town Hall
Speaker: Air Force General Lloyd “Fig” Newton, Retired four-star general, Commander, Air Education & Training Command, first African-American pilot in the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds and Ridgeland-native. Newton is also the founder/promoter of the new Polaris Tech Charter School in Jasper County.
Topic: Military Stories

April 9-Town Hall
Speaker: Jonathan Haupt, Executive Director, Pat Conroy Literary Center
Topic: Pat Conroy Literary Center and the legacy of Pat Conroy as a student, teacher and mentor.

June 11-Town Hall
Speaker: Jeff Fulgham, Bluffton native, historian and author of, “The Bluffton Expedition: The Burning of Bluffton, SC, During the Civil War”
Topic: The Burning of Bluffton

For more information about the lecture series, please call
1 (843) 709-0880

Beaufort History Museum Celebrates the History of Women’s Hats

The Beaufort History Museum’s Third Annual Spring Tea is titled “Crowning Glory – Celebrating the Role of Women’s Hats in Southern Culture”.   Patrons are invited to wear their favorite hat and to “Strut their Hattitude” as they savor delicious traditional delicacies, sip tea, learn about the fascinating allure of fashionable hats from celebrity speakers, enjoy a Parade of Hats and bid at a silent auction featuring trips, dinners and other attractive items.

“Hats are really the stars this year,” says BHM Board President Carol Lauvray.
“We’ll take a look back at how meaningful church hats were and are, especially in the African American community, where they held a special significance.  We will also spotlight other occasions where hats play a key role, such as South Carolina’s legendary steeplechase thoroughbred horse races in Elloree, Aiken and Camden.  Southern women just know how to dress for a party! We are encouraging everyone to wear a beautiful hat and join in the festive spirit of the Tea.”

About the Tea

The tea is scheduled for Wednesday, May 10, from 1-4 pm at the Dataw Island Club’s scenic Carolina Room. Reservations can be made at http://tea.beauforthistorymuseum.com.  Individual tickets are $60 and tables of 10 are available for $500 (see the website for restrictions and instructions to reserve a table.) Seating is limited. Proceeds benefit the projects of the Beaufort History Museum.

 

For the first time the museum is hosting a silent auction at the tea to include trips, dinners, cooking classes, tastings, luxury services and other attractive items available for bidding. A preview of the auction items will be posted on the Museum’s website with a “Buy it Now” option. Guests will also be able to view the items, choose the ones they like and then bid with cash or credit cards at the event.

Celebrity Designer

The principal speaker at the Tea is celebrity shoe designer and milliner Etu Evans, who will be coming to Beaufort from New York. His grandmother and mother, both of whom had extensive collections of church hats, jewels and shoes, influenced Evans’ path in the fashion industry.

 

An internationally prominent designer, he studied millinery at New York’s prestigious Parsons School of Design and the Fashion Institute of Technology where he graduated with an Associate’s Degree in Footwear and Accessory Design.
Evans’ hats have been sold in his Harlem boutique and worn across Europe and Japan and have been featured in various national television shows and publications.  For a featured auction item he will offer one lucky bidder a consultation on the most flattering hat styles and correct size for the shape of her face and stature.

 

The famous Goorin Brothers Hat Company, founded in 1895, which has stores across the U.S. and in Canada with local shops in Savannah and Charleston, will also be a part of the program.  Hats and accessories will be on view along with advice on how to choose the perfect hat.

Event Sponsors

The Clark Troutman Group, Merrill Lynch Wealth Management is sponsor of the Third Annual Beaufort History Museum Tea along with Live Oak Builders and the Carolina Cup Racing Association. Additional sponsorship opportunities are available and may be arranged by contacting Lauvray by email clauvray@beauforthistorymuseum.com.

About the Museum

Beaufort History Museum, located in the historic Arsenal, has evolved to focus specifically on the history of the Beaufort District. It strives to manage and display artifacts and documents held by the City of Beaufort, telling the compelling stories of this area from the early 16th Century until modern times.  The Arsenal address is 713 Craven Street. BHM’s hours of operation are 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM Monday – Saturday.

Join the Museum

To join the Museum please visit the website at www.beauforthistorymuseum.com. To learn more about becoming a Volunteer Greeter or Docent please contact Lorrie Burleynoles at lburleynoles@beauforthistorymuseum.com.

 

Beaufort History Museum Announces April History Lecture Series

 Topics Include Harriet Tubman and Gullah Culture

 Beaufort History Museum will present two lectures that are part of the popular historical series co-sponsored with the Beaufort County Library.  Both lectures take place at the Beaufort Branch Library located at 311 Scott Street.  Admission is free but reservations are required and space is limited.   To reserve a seat visit the Museum website at www.beauforthistorymuseum.com

The lectures are:

Tuesday, April 4  – 2 pm – 

Harriet Tubman: A Glimpse into the Life of a Woman of Courage

Hear about Harriet Tubman’s (aka, Araminta Ross) life as a slave, her escape to freedom, and her work with the Underground Railroad. You’ll learn how she helped to liberate hundreds of Lowcountry slaves in the Combahee Raid during the Civil War and about her work after the war as a humanitarian, suffragette and friend to the indigent.

 Lecturer: Andrea Allen, Beaufort History Museum Board Member

Andrea is a member of the historic Tabernacle Baptist Church in downtown Beaufort, where she is a musician for the Senior Choir and serves as Sunday School Superintendent. She retired in 2015 from the Coastal Empire Community Mental Health Center, as the Assistant Director for a five-county area, after serving 37 years in the SC Department of Mental Health. She joined the Board of Directors of the Beaufort History Museum in January 2016.

Thursday, April 20, 20172 pm – Gullah History and Culture

The lecture will cover the origin of the Gullah natives primarily located along the coastal areas of South Carolina and tell why they were concentrated in large numbers on various isolated islands such as Dafuskie, Johns Island, Kiawah, Port Royal and Wadmalaw. Saint Helena has the largest number of Gullah natives (6, 500) where a strong culture still exists.  Learn about their arrival as slaves through the Port of Charleston, how they were dispersed throughout the state, how their labor contributed to the wealth of the Planters and what exactly happened to these natives after the “Big Gun Shoot” (The Battle of Port Royal Sound) on November 7, 1861.

Questions will be answered. How did they acquire the lands they now live on? What was the importance of the Praise Houses? How did the language develop? Discussion will include what makes up a culture and how is it expressed among the Gullahs. This is a lively presentation, which explains how their practices evolved into what is referred to as Gullah History and Culture.

Lecturer: Mary Rivers LeGree is a native of Saint Helena Island. Her early years were spent on the Rivers’ family compound among her parents and other relatives. She was educated in NYC and University of Detroit (BA). After retirement in 2004, Ms. LeGree returned to Saint Helena Island and lives on the property that had been purchased by her ancestors shortly after the Civil War. She is eager to share their untold history and their practices from a genuine perspective, having been brought up in the culture. She is a past Planning Commissioner for Saint Helena District, and serves as a member of the Saint Helena Community Preservation Committee.

Beaufort History Museum, located in the historic Arsenal, has evolved to focus specifically on the history of the Beaufort District. It strives to manage and display artifacts and documents held by the City of Beaufort, telling the compelling stories of this area from the early 16th Century until modern times.  The Arsenal address is 713 Craven Street. BHM’s hours of operation are 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM Monday –Saturday.

 

The Beaufort County Library System is a free and accessible marketplace of ideas, information, and culture that fosters learning, community, and information literacy. The Library provides open and guided access to a wide variety of media and programs to inform, inspire, and empower all its patrons in their pursuit of lifelong learning, personal enrichment, and cultural understanding. The library system operates five branch libraries throughout Beaufort County and library cards are available free of charge to all county residents and property owners. It offers free access to millions of items through a combined online catalog and digital library.

 

The Beaufort District Collection (BDC) is the Library’s special local history and archives unit. BDC staff and docents are stewards who collect, protect and share a research collection of permanent value about local history, Gullah culture, the natural southeastern coastal environment, family history and archaeology. For the BDC’s hours of operation, please visit its website at beaufortcountylibrary.org

 

Brookgreen Gardens Hosts Black History Month Program

 “Mirrored Images:  Race Relations Today and Yesterday” is the theme of the  Black History Month observance at Brookgreen Gardens on Saturday, February 25.  It will include reflections by the authors of the book, “We Are Charleston:  Tragedy and Triumph at Mother Emanuel” and a performance of freedom songs, spirituals, and work songs, at 1 p.m. in the Wall Lowcountry Center Auditorium.  The program is free with garden admission; however, seating must be reserved at 843-235-6049.

(Left to right) Bernard Powers, Ph.D., Marjory Wentworth, Herb Frazier

Charleston authors Herb Frazier, Bernard Powers, and Marjory Wentworth will discuss mirrored images as reflected in their writings.  Singer Rozlyn Sorrel of Charlotte, NC will perform a mini-concert during the 90-minute event.

Frazier is the public relations and marketing manager for Magnolia Plantation and Gardens near Charleston, S.C. He grew up in the Ansonborough public housing projects in Charleston and at the U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. He has edited and reported for five daily newspapers in the South, including his hometown paper, The Post and Courier.  Powers is professor of history at the College of Charleston teaching courses in American, African American and African diasporic history. His major work, “Black Charlestonians: A Social History 1822-1885,” was designated an Outstanding Academic Book by “Choice Magazine.”  Wentworth, SC Poet Laureate, is a Pushcart Prize-nominated poet who has worked extensively in human rights for organizations such as the UN High Commission for Refugees in Geneva, Switzerland; The Whole World Institute of Boston; and Church World Service in New York. She is the co-author of “Taking a Stand.”
Brookgreen Gardens, a National Historic Landmark and non-profit organization, is located on U.S. 17 between Murrells Inlet and Pawleys Island, South Carolina, and open to the public daily.

For more information, visit our web site at www.brookgreen.org or call 843-235-6000.

 

American Civil War Corps Commander at Museum of Coastal Carolina on January 17

The Sand Bar Lecture Series continues at the Museum of Coastal Carolina featuring the American Civil War Corps Commander Tuesday, January 17 at 6 PM.

Join presenter Douglas Elliott for an evening of enlightenment on life in the early 1860’s and accept a promotion to the level of Corp Commander in the American Civil War. Our view of the world today is through 2017 eyes but he will step you back into the 1860’s and change your view and perspective. He’ll explore how he got the job, what is needed to know, responsibilities, and the effects of your actions.  When done you will have a perspective on the military, political, and social impacts of decisions. Together the group will discuss how this new found knowledge was applied at the battle of Gettysburg and look forward to today to see how much has changed.

Elliott notes, “I look forward to our time together and promise a night of learning, lots of interactive discussion, and time for questions.”

Elliott’s background includes portraying an American Civil War reenactor for 18 years, a lifelong military history student, a member of the 140th New York Volunteer Infantry Living History Organization, and he has delivered 200+ lectures to students of all ages on the Civil War. He can be seen on the Documentary “Regiment” as a historical commentator.

Admission to the museum is free for museum and dual museum/planetarium members. Non-member all-day admission (including NC sales tax) is $9.50 for adults, $8.50 for seniors, $7.50 for children (3-12), and free for age 2 and under. For more information, call the museum at 910-579-1016 or visit www.MuseumPlanetarium.org.

Historian Joseph Opala Presents Gullah Heritage Program

Historian and anthropologist Joseph Opala will kick-off the 2017 “The Reign of Rice Lecture Series” at Brookgreen Gardens.  The theme for the three-monthly programs, which provide information about the complexity of Gullah Geechee heritage through the production of rice, is “Shared Cultural Elements of Rice Heritage.”  In recognition of Native American shared cultural vestiges, Opala will present “The Black Seminoles:  Gullah Freedom Fighters and the African Frontier in North America” at 1:00 p.m. in the Welcome Center Conference Room on January 21.  The program is free with garden admission.  Seating must be reserved at 843-235-6049.

Opala, of Harrisonburg, VA, is known for his research on the “Gullah Connection.” He has spent 40 years using historical discoveries to bring Sierra Leoneans, Gullahs, and Black Seminoles together in a series of homecomings along the entire migration route, from West Africa to Mexico.  His talk will relay how some Gullahs used their rice farming skills to win their freedom.

 

Other events about Gullah heritage include an educational exhibit and two Wednesday programs.

 

“Shine On, Gullah.  Shine On.”, an exhibit of Story Quilts, Fabric Collages, and Prints by Fabric Chronicler Dorothy Montgomery of Charleston, will be displayed at Learning Lab I of the Wall Lowcountry Center from 12-4:30 p.m. daily from January 9 through March 12.  Her art reflects Gullah history and culture and her Gullah experiences, including language and traditions.  Each quilt uses a variety of mediums including fabric and acrylic paints, ink, crayons, embroidery floss, dye sticks, and appliqués.

 

The Wednesday “Gullah Geechee Program Series” will feature two guest presenters. On January 18, Montgomery will present a lecture about her exhibit. On January 25, Gillian Richards-Greaves, Ph.D., will present “Connections with Gullah Geechee and Caribbean/West African Cultures,” identifying Africanisms/African retentions in both.  Richards-Greaves is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology and Geography and the Assistant Director for the Charles Joyner Institute for Gullah and African Diaspora Studies at Coastal Carolina University.  Each program will be at 1:00 p.m., in the Wall Lowcountry Center Auditorium and is free with garden admission. Seating must be reserved at 843-235-6049.

 

Brookgreen Gardens, a National Historic Landmark and non-profit organization, is located on U.S. 17 between Myrtle Beach and Pawleys Island, South Carolina, and is open to the public daily. For more information, consult our web site at www.brookgreen.org or call 843-235-6000.

American Civil War Corps Commander at Museum of Coastal Carolina on December 6

officerzouve-me-002The Sand Bar Lecture Series continues at the Museum of Coastal Carolina Tuesday, December 6 at 6 PM, featuring the American Civil War Corps Commander.

Join presenter Douglas Elliott for an evening of enlightenment on life in the early 1860’s and accept a promotion to the level of Corp Commander in the American Civil War.

Our view of the world today is through 2016 eyes, but he will step you back into the 1860’s and change your view and perspective. He’ll explore how he got the job, what is needed to know, responsibilities, and the effects of your actions.  When done you will have a perspective on the military, political, and social impacts of your decisions. Together the group will discuss how this new found knowledge was applied at the battle of Gettysburg and look forward to today to see how much has changed.

Elliott notes, “I look forward to our time together and promise a night of learning, lots of interactive discussion, and time for your questions.”

Elliott’s background includes portraying an American Civil War re-enactor for 18 years, a lifelong military history student, a member of the 140th New York Volunteer Infantry Living History Organization and has delivered 200+ lectures to students of all ages on the Civil War. He can be seen on the documentary “Regiment” as a Historical Commentator, a nationally syndicated award winning story of the 140th NYVI.

Admission to the museum is free for museum and dual museum/planetarium members. Non-member all-day admission (including NC sales tax) is $9.50 for adults, $8.50 for seniors, $7.50 for children (3-12), and free for age 2 and under.

For more information, call the museum at 910-579-1016 or visit www.MuseumPlanetarium.org.